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Poster: dark.starz Date: Aug 12, 2012 1:19pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: When did GD start recording on DATs?

DAT's introduction to the marketplace at large was primarily 1987-1989. The majority of tapers didn't adopt DAT until the early 90s. JVC DAS-90 VHS recorders began to appear with the tapers in the spring of 1983, followed shortly there after by the Sony PCM-F1 Beta.

We taped the Sept 6th, 1983 Red Rocks show on my friends JVC set-up. The sound was dynamic, great low frequency extension and weight, but somewhat hard sounding and fatiguing in the upper midrange and top end. The Sennheiser 441 / Sony TC-D5M tapes of these shows sound more open and smoother on the top-end.

By the early 90s, there were several professional grade multi-track digital recording consoles available. If my memory serves me well, the Dead recorded most of 1989 - Spring 1990 to 24 track analog, yes?

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This post was modified by dark.starz on 2012-08-12 20:19:22

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Poster: Headstrung Date: Aug 11, 2012 8:10pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: When did GD start recording on DATs?

When are you going to post those 1971 shows Koch? Is that project of transferring nearing its end?

The Dead started with the precursor to DAT called PCM in the early eighties but to what extent I am not sure. I bet Monte or one of the other tapers who periodically visit this site might have more specific information.

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Poster: Skobud Date: Aug 12, 2012 9:03am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: When did GD start recording on DATs?

You have no idea what you are talking about. You cannot back up anything you say because you are intellectually incapable of defending any of you ridiculous wiki-theories regarding the science behind sound. I do like your new picture books though. It gives everyone a very good idea of the level you are on.

What value there is for you to constantly make a fool of yourself, and to be proven wrong constantly, and told that very thing publicly - is beyond me Rob.